The Studio 4 Blog
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Blog Archives

Thinking about a WordPress site? Consider these first.

WordPress is fast becoming one of the biggest platforms that individuals and companies are using to create their websites. Unfortunately there are some downsides to this versatile platform, which may cause you problems later on down the line.

Primarily it is a blog platform, and when used for that it can be great. Our own blog uses WordPress, however it is not a CMS (Content Management System), therefore there are restrictions on what can be modified. Many fail to get the hosting and security done properly, which can hinder the sites performance and how well it can be found.

There are functionality limits. WordPress is not scalable. Given that it is a blog at its core, it is not meant to be your ultimate company website that helps you streamline your day to day operations. The plugins that are available to you will limit what you can do to your … [Read More]

Has Google sparked a trend which spells the end for left hand navigation?

It may seem like a trivial change to some, but the recent update to Google’s navigation bar has, for many, signalled the end of an era when it comes to web design.

The acclaimed search engine has unveiled a subtle upgrade to it’s navigation in recent weeks – as opposed to being displayed on the left of the page, navigation now takes pride of place at the top and centre. Being a big name when it comes to the web, this may well set a trend for web developers to take note of. The reasons behind the change have not been officially cited, but we at The Studio 4 have our own theories.

Left hand navigation used to be accepted as the standard, mainly due to the way we tend to read and take in information (ie: In western cultures, from left to right). Not only this, but it provided … [Read More]

Facebook – is it worth paying for popularity?

There’s no denying that Facebook holds a distinct presence in social networking, which is more than likely due to it’s constant reinvention and steady stream of new features. These new features serve a purpose. They help keep it fresh, newsworthy and at the forefront of our minds – which is exactly what a social networking site should strive to be.

But with constant change also comes constant upheaval (and occasional backlash). The 2011 introduction of the timeline, for example, was the cause of many a disgruntled outburst from dis-satisfied users who immediately missed the familiarity and comfort of the tried and true, old-school “wall”. Outraged that a free service had changed without consulting them first, presumably.

Since founding the site in 2004, Zuckerberg and his team have reportedly built up it’s worth to over $1 billion, and their increasing efforts to monetise have become less and less subtle. In … [Read More]

Don’t go changing…three words that don’t apply online

Don’t go changing. The first three words of a famous song might provide sound advice in matters of the heart, but they make absolutely no sense at all when it comes to business.

And it is certainly true when it comes to doing business online. Standing still online is never an option.

Change is good. Change is what we should all embrace.

Yes, I know, that’s all well and good in theory but when it comes to practice we all have a certain amount of fear and loathing when it comes to change.

If we encounter something new when we ae expecting the familiar, our first impressions are not always positive. In fact, they can be downright hostile.

That is just as true online, witness the fall-out from any new developments and announcements from our favourite search engines or social networking sites. Twitter’s recent announcement on the “open exchange of [Read More]

Socail medai is’nt desroyting spellin and grammer

I waved goodbye to my last full-time role in the newspaper industry six years ago and immediately found myself embroiled in an online row regarding the quality of the blogs the company I had just left were introducing.

The subject matter of the blogs was not the issue. The poor spelling, grammar and overall style of many of the individual posts was, however, proving a major source of distraction and irritation.

It wasn’t just me complaining, regular readers were not impressed either. When such mistakes were pointed out, apologies were forthcoming…initially.

But there came a point when the newspaper, the bloggers and their editor went on the offensive and stopped apologising for the regular mistakes. “The rules have changed,” I was reliably informed. “This is blogging, it isn’t journalism. So that stuff about spelling and grammar doesn’t always matter these days.”

My argument did not change. It came down to … [Read More]