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Blog Archives

Facebook – is it worth paying for popularity?

There’s no denying that Facebook holds a distinct presence in social networking, which is more than likely due to it’s constant reinvention and steady stream of new features. These new features serve a purpose. They help keep it fresh, newsworthy and at the forefront of our minds – which is exactly what a social networking site should strive to be.

But with constant change also comes constant upheaval (and occasional backlash). The 2011 introduction of the timeline, for example, was the cause of many a disgruntled outburst from dis-satisfied users who immediately missed the familiarity and comfort of the tried and true, old-school “wall”. Outraged that a free service had changed without consulting them first, presumably.

Since founding the site in 2004, Zuckerberg and his team have reportedly built up it’s worth to over $1 billion, and their increasing efforts to monetise have become less and less subtle. In … [Read More]

Once upon a timeline….

Apparently more people in the world have Facebook than they do kettles. I don’t know whether this is true or not but I want to believe it. I have a kettle and I have Facebook – this must mean that I’m a fully fledged member of the twenty-first century. Admittedly I couldn’t live without either. Well, perhaps that’s not quite true. Given the choice I’d keep the kettle – I wouldn’t be able to face the world, let alone Facebook without a cup of tea at 8am.

Whether you resisted or embraced the change, everyone of Facebook’s 900 million users has now been moved over to the new timeline format. I’m getting used to it. I think it’s rather good actually. People moan – they always do when Facebook alters/is temporarily unavailable. Perhaps Facebook deprivation is a greater torture than tea/coffee deprivation?

Timeline does offer the user a greater control … [Read More]

Pinning your hopes on the next big thing

I met a futurologist once who was deeply embarrassed about his job title, but provided a fascinating hour-long chat on trend-spotting.

He said identifying the next big thing was as much down to probability and predictability than a sixth sense. You look at current trends and how they are evolving for an insight into what might happen next.

I likened his role to BBC’s Tomorrow’s World programme, which served up a tantalising glimpse into the future that in hindsight was not always very accurate. But he shook his head and claimed to be far more conservative in his predictions than the BBC show ever was.

I was reminded of that encounter during the last few weeks as I took a look around Pinterest.

It is relatively new on my social media radar, but the site is actually two years old. Not exactly the new kid on the social media … [Read More]

Do you like your customers?

The customer is always right. But do you have to like them too?

Social networking has changed the way many firms handle customer service. And those same social networking sites have given other firms the type of PR headaches they have spent years studiously trying to avoid.

Learning how to make best use of social networking sites is vitally important these days. A growing number of companies are taken a carefully considered and measured approach to using social media channels to interact with their customers…and even to like them.

Customer engagement has never been so easy...or so immediate

These companies are actively engaging in a very public conversation with people who buy their products and services, causing a mini revolution in terms of traditional customer service.

Social networking is revolutionising customer service. There are more and more examples of companies using Twitter to deal with individual customer complaints and get … [Read More]

Socail medai is’nt desroyting spellin and grammer

I waved goodbye to my last full-time role in the newspaper industry six years ago and immediately found myself embroiled in an online row regarding the quality of the blogs the company I had just left were introducing.

The subject matter of the blogs was not the issue. The poor spelling, grammar and overall style of many of the individual posts was, however, proving a major source of distraction and irritation.

It wasn’t just me complaining, regular readers were not impressed either. When such mistakes were pointed out, apologies were forthcoming…initially.

But there came a point when the newspaper, the bloggers and their editor went on the offensive and stopped apologising for the regular mistakes. “The rules have changed,” I was reliably informed. “This is blogging, it isn’t journalism. So that stuff about spelling and grammar doesn’t always matter these days.”

My argument did not change. It came down to … [Read More]